Neversong Nintendo Switch Quick Hit Review

The Song Remains The Same
Neversong Switch Hero Banner

I have a love/hate relationship with platformers, mostly because I tend not to do well with them. When one tempts me by including my “first love”, music, well then I’m intrigued. Even for the sake of injuring my fingers due to button mashing. Neversong, by Atmos Games and Serenity Forge, is actually a game we reviewed just about four months ago on PC. This quick-hit review will focus on more of how Neversong transitioned to the Nintendo Switch console system and whether or not you should consider adding it to your Switch library. Welcome to our quick-hit review of Neversong for the Nintendo Switch system!

The Song Remains The Same
Neversong - Meet My Friend

One of Peet’s bizarre pals.

While my choice of subheadings here might conjure up memories of a great Led Zeppelin song with the same title my choice of words is not meant to be degrading. Just the opposite in fact. You see even after playing the Switch version of Neversong I couldn’t agree more with many of the things my compadre, Damien Gula, talks about in his PC review. In fact, his very favorable score indeed holds true for the Nintendo Switch version!

Darkness Fills The Void In Peet’s Heart
Neversong - Many Levels

One of the in-game savepoints.

The backdrop and story for Neversong is a dark one. You play the game as the boy Peet who got lost in a coma. Upon waking up, Peet’s girlfriend, Wren, is nowhere to be found. In this side-scroller, you’ll investigate the screams coming from the heart of the town of Neverwood. Face off against some bizarre zombie invested versions of the grownups and partake is some of the weirdest dialogue with Peet’s quirky friends. It all seems to play out in some bizarre Tim Burton-esque setting.

While the gameplay isn’t terribly spooky the setting and theme make this a tough one to suggest for younger games. Being a parent, and grandparent, I’m inclined to recommend against it, especially when there are so many other family-friendly games available on the Switch.

An Impeccable Conversion
Neversong - Play It Again Peet

Puzzles include replaying music, encountered in-game, to unlock things.

Neversong truly took me by surprise! Regardless of how quirky and dark the presentation is, the platforming and “Metroidvania” gameplay is fun and engaging while the controls are responsive, and fluid.

In the time spent playing the game I played entirely undocked. It was all smooth and fluid. Even things like on-screen text were manageable to read. For once someone got it right! The game incorporates a manual save style via save points you encounter. Even so, Neversong recovered well from the use of the Switch’s inherent “sleep” save mode.

The only minor complaint I could muster is that you’ll travel back and forth through many of the same areas. You’re given subtle hints on where you need to go next without giving any solutions away. Puzzles are in the form of object manipulation, more than anything, but I never found it to be too daunting. As you progress through the game you’ll unlock “skills”, for lack of a better word. This style goes hand in hand with the fact you’ll pass by some things on a screen and think “I wonder how I unlock this” or “how do I get up there”. A lot of these questions are answered as you progress forward in the game.

Here’s Looking At You Kid
Cards & Cosmetics

Some of the things cards can unlock

One nice feature I liked in the game is finding hidden “cards”. These cards, when found, some in odd places, add more information to the story or add cosmetics. It was a nice touch as a “find and collect” type sub-system.

In conclusion, Neversong on the Nintendo Switch is a great port of a great game! It’s a perfect on-the-go platformer but one that leans heavily to the “for young adults+ only” gamer due to its dark connotations and undertones.

Note: Our copy was reviewed on the Nintendo Switch with a code provided by PR.

COMPARE TO: Hollow Knight, Gleamlight

Written by
Scott is a comic book, music and gaming nerd since the late 70s. Gaming all began on the Colecovision and Atari 2600. He buys and reads new comics every Wednesday from his LCBS and helps run an online Heavy Metal radio station.

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